The Link Between Airway and Dental Issues

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

At Eggert Family Dentistry, we recognize the importance of a thorough dental evaluation. When you or your child come in for an exam, we don’t just attend to your teeth and gums. We make it our business to examine your muscles, jaw, and airway as well. We want to ensure that your tongue is functioning properly, that you have a broad upper arch, are able to breathe easily through your nose, and are swallowing correctly.

Why are we so thorough?

Many people don’t realize that they’re struggling with airway issues because the bulk of the symptoms manifest themselves while we’re asleep. Also, the body is so good at adapting, sometimes what someone knows as “their normal” is necessarily the most “healthy normal.” Luckily, Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff understand the connection between a variety of dental problems and how they may be linked to airway issues. For example, all of these dental problems that we check for during a regular dental examination can be linked to airway issues:

  • Bruxism
  • Functional tooth wear and fracture
  • TMD/myofascial pain
  • Malocclusion
  • Erosion
  • Periodontal disease
  • Caries
  • Abfractions (severe gum tissue recession)
  • Impacted teeth
  • Orthodontic or orthognathic relapse

The intersection of dental issues and airway: A couple examples

Nocturnal bruxism, or teeth grinding, is not uncommon in children and some doctors will tell parents it “normal.” We now understand that often tooth grinding, especially in children at night, often occurs because of a restricted airway. In fact, the connection between bruxism and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is so strong that bruxism is now acknowledged as a clinical marker for SDB and children with this disorder should consider a sleep screening.

Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS) is another type of sleep disordered breathing. Unlike sleep apnea, patients with UARS typically don’t completely stop breathing, however, the resistance of air through the airway causes multiple micro-arousals throughout the night. This often creates fatigue because the body is never able to reach the deeper and reparative stages of sleep. UARS also causes more stress hormones to be released into the body as a mechanism to help the body maintain and airway. These extra stress hormones often lead to an increase of inflammatory markers and can be linked to inflammatory diseases like hypertension, diabetes, TMD, cancer, among others.

Fortunately, a thorough dental examination can help detect a wide variety of dental problems that may be caused by or contributing to airway issues and/or sleep disordered breathing. Our dental exams go above and beyond simply looking for cavities and help you achieve and maintain optimal wellness.

Want to learn more?

If you’re interested in the connection between dental problems and airway issues, we highly recommend these books:

Sleep Interrupted by Steven Park, MD
No More Allergies, Asthma or Sinus Infections by Dr. Lori Jones
Close Your Mouth by Patrick McKeown
The Oxygen Advantage by Patrick McKeown

If you are concerned that dental issues are causing airway issues for you or your child, contact Eggert Family Dentistry or give us a call at 651.482.8412!

The Effects of Airway Issues in Children

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

From a professional teeth cleaning to preventative screening for cavities and other looming dental issues, recare visits at Eggert Family Dentistry are an important part of your child’s healthcare routine. We also recognize that airway issues can mean severe health problems for your child. On this account, one of the important components of your child’s recare visit is our thorough screening for any abnormalities of the head or skull or anything unusual with the positioning of the jaw, palate, tongue, throat, tonsils or adenoids that could lead to mouth-breathing and contribute in any way to an airway issue.

It all begins with how we breathe

Air that enters the lungs through the mouth as opposed to the nose isn’t warmed or humidified in the nasal cavity. This makes a person more prone to infection. Additionally, blood gas studies cite a 20% drop in oxygen levels and a 20% rise in CO2 levels, increasing exhaustion, due to mouth breathing. Long-term oxygen deprivation can result in hypertension, malfunctioning lungs and enlargement of the right ventricle of the heart.

Whereas nasal-breathing is recognized as imperative to good health, mouth-breathing has many negative effects on the body. When air hits the back of the throat, it causes the airway to dry out and lose its elasticity. This makes the airway more susceptible to collapsing. In the instance of a partial airway obstruction, children may exhibit snoring tendencies. When the airway is fully obstructed, children suffer from the dangerous effects of sleep apnea.

Signs and symptoms of airway obstruction in children

  • Snoring
  • Heavy/loud breathing
  • Struggling to breathe at night
  • Daytime mouth-breathing
  • Dry mouth in the morning
  • Bedwetting
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Underweight
  • Attention deficit problems (fidgety, easily distracted, interrupts frequently)

ADHD

Oftentimes, airway issues in children leads to behavioral problems. This occurs as a result of restricted oxygen to the brain, leading to fitful sleep, increased daytime irritability, distraction and hyperactivity. Unfortunately, many children who experience these behavior problems are medicated for ADHD with Adderall or Ritalin and the serious nature of airway issues go undetected. In a 2014 article in ADDitude, an online journal subtitled Inside the ADHD mind, NuSomnea claims that 50 percent of children diagnosed with ADHD show behavior improvement after being treated for obstructive sleep apnea and they suggest that up to 7 million children have been misdiagnosed with ADHD when in actuality they’re struggling with sleep issues, sometimes as severe as obstructive sleep apnea.

Another serious consequence of airway obstruction in children is growth deficiency. Children struggling with airway obstruction will experience restricted levels of oxygen to the brain, reducing the amount of growth hormone their body secretes. These children will be underweight and shorter in stature than their peers and may experience a plateau in their growth trajectory.

If your child is due for a recare visit or if you are concerned that your child may be predisposed to airway issues, contact us or schedule an appointment with Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff at 651.482.8412 today!

Sleep Apnea in Children – An Overview

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

There is a growing awareness about the dangers of obstructive sleep apnea. However, what most people don’t know is that sleep apnea affects adults and children alike. Early intervention for children who struggle with sleep apnea can greatly improve their quality of life and protect them from serious complications and risk of death. Fortunately, knowledge is power. When equipped with knowledge about what pediatric sleep apnea is, signs to watch for that indicate a problem, and awareness of risk factors that can contribute to sleep apnea, you possess the tools you need to intervene if a child you love is at risk.

What is sleep apnea?

Just like the name sounds, obstructive sleep apnea is an airway blockage. During sleep, the most common cause for apnea is when muscles in the back of the throat relax, the tongue and surrounding tissues migrate back into the throat, and therefore obstruct the airway.

Symptoms of pediatric sleep apnea

The symptoms of pediatric sleep apnea are very different than sleep apnea symptoms in adults. Whereas adults suffer primarily from incessant snoring and chronic daytime fatigue, children’s symptoms vary greatly. Children may or may not snore and may actually appear hyperactive during the day. Oftentimes, kids who struggle with undiagnosed sleep apnea are misdiagnosed with ADHD. Other pediatric symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Restless sleep
  • Snorting, coughing or choking in their sleep
  • Mouth-breathing
  • Bedwetting
  • Sleep terrors
  • Learning problems
  • Behavior problems
  • Persistent fatigue
  • Poor weight gain and growth

Risk factors that can contribute to pediatric sleep apnea

There are numerous conditions that predispose a child to sleep apnea. Some of these risk factors include:

  • Obesity
  • Down syndrome
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Family history of sleep apnea
  • Airway blockages from tonsils and adenoids
  • Low birth weight
  • Neuromuscular disease
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Craniofacial abnormalities

When to see a doctor

If your child is a mouth-breather and consistently wakes up feeling tired or exhibits ADHD symptoms during waking hours, it’s a good idea to bring him or her into the doctor for evaluation. You may want to consider an appointment with an ENT who looks at sleep OR a sleep doctor directly.

If you’re concerned that craniofacial abnormalities are causing sleep apnea for your child, call Eggert Family Dentistry. Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff can evaluate your child’s teeth, jaw, tongue, and airway and make recommendations. Depending on your child’s age, Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff can fit your child with an in-mouth appliance – similar to an orthodontic retainer – which helps to maintain an open airway all night long.

Complications of untreated sleep apnea in kids and adults

When left untreated, sleep apnea in children can result in failure to grow and thrive, poor brain development, heart problems, and even death. If left untreated into adulthood, sleep apnea can decrease a person’s lifespan by up to 10 years, cause an increase in blood pressure, an increase in the risk of heart attack, stroke, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and dementia.

Needless to say, sleep apnea is nothing to mess around with. Eggert Family Dentistry is proud to be sleep apnea savvy, serving our patients with the knowledge, skills and resources to effectively screen for and often treat sleep apnea in both children and adults. If you’re concerned that someone you love is suffering from sleep apnea, give us a call at 651.482.8412 or contact us to set up an evaluation.

Which Cosmetic Dentistry Procedure is Right for My Teen?

By Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

During the adolescent years, kids typically struggle with their self-image. This can be compounded for teens who are forced to deal with chipped, misaligned, discolored or gapped teeth. Fortunately, at Eggert Family Dentistry, we offer some great cosmetic dentistry options that can help restore your teen’s teeth and go a long way towards increasing their self-confidence.

Teeth Whitening

When it comes to teeth whitening and bleaching, Eggert Family Dentistry offers some excellent options. We supply professional-grade strips and whitening trays that are more effective and gentler on your teeth and gums than their over-the-counter counterparts. We also offer the Zoom Whitening procedure. Performed in a single, two-hour appointment, we apply a professional whitening gel to your teen’s teeth and activate that gel with an LED light which allows the gel to penetrate into the teeth. We then educate both you and your child on follow-up care and sensitivity management.

Dental Veneers

Dental veneers are ultra-thin porcelain shells that cover the front of teeth. Veneers dramatically transform chipped, misaligned, discolored or worn down teeth into that award-winning smile. They can also be used to close unsightly gaps for a smile your teen will be proud to share. Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff custom create dental veneers that compliment your child’s skin tone, facial features and personality and feel just like their natural teeth. This process takes two to three visits and the results are long-lasting.

Dental Bonding

Dental bonding, also known as composite veneers, is also effective in restoring chipped, misaligned, discolored or worn teeth just like dental veneers. Some differences do apply for these different restorations, however. For example, dental bonding can be completed in a single appointment. Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff apply a putty-like composite resin to your teen’s tooth, sculpt and shape it before curing and hardening the material with an intense blue light. Once polished, composite veneers have a smooth and shiny finish, blending in well with the natural teeth.  Dental bonding is popular since it is a more cost-effective option than dental veneers. However, the results typically only last or look their best for 5-10 years. But, that makes it a perfect option for getting your teen through their growing years when the body and jaw are still changing.

At Eggert Family Dentistry, we are changing lives one smile at a time, which is why our motto is “Dentistry for a Lifetime of Smiles.” If you have a special teenager in your life who could benefit from one of these cosmetic dentistry procedures, give us a call at 651.482.8412. We would be happy to discuss how we can partner with you to help your adolescent achieve a smile they can be proud of!

Dental Health for Teens: Answers to Some Common Questions

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Raising a teenager is exciting. It’s fun to watch your teen grow in their confidence and independence and step out and try new things. However, as they navigate new territory, oftentimes so do you! In fact, many days you may feel like you have more questions than answers! Sound familiar? Thankfully, when it comes to dentistry, Eggert Family Dentistry has the information you need to prepare for whatever dental situations arise during your child’s teen years. Let’s take a look at some questions we frequently field from parents of teens and share some information we think you will find helpful!

What kind of cosmetic dentistry is appropriate for my teen?

Most teens struggle with self-confidence and work hard to maintain their image. Chipped, discolored or gaping teeth can play a big role in tanking a teen’s confidence level. Luckily, we offer some effective cosmetic dentistry procedures at Eggert Family Dentistry to benefit your teen. Bonding is an affordable and effective way to repair chipped teeth and can help fill in gaps. Composite or porcelain veneers can help reshape misshapen or unevenly-sized teeth. Also, bleaching options like the  Philips Zoom procedure are perfect for creating a whiter smile.

How do I know if my teen is a candidate for braces?

Few dental situations make a teen feel more self-conscious than crooked teeth. Not only do braces straighten teeth and correct your teen’s bite but because crooked teeth can lead to other oral health problems, braces also reduce the instance of cavities and gum disease. It’s never too early to begin the braces conversation with Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff! While we are not an orthodontic office and only provide some Invisalign services, we are happy to refer you to some excellent orthodontists in the area when recommended.

What do I need to know about wisdom teeth?

Wisdom teeth typically start erupting between the ages of 17-21. However, many people don’t have room in their mouth for this third set of molars and they should be removed. Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff will monitor your teen’s unerupted wisdom teeth with x-rays and oral examinations. If we perceive that your teen’s mouth does not have adequate space for wisdom teeth or if we can see from x-rays that they are coming in crooked, we will refer you to an oral surgeon who can remove them, oftentimes before they even start erupting and causing problems.

My teen plays contact sports. What do I do if they knock out a permanent tooth?

First of all, the best defense against a knocked out tooth is a mouthguard. Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff can craft your teen a custom mouthguard that will fit snugly against their teeth and protect them while they’re playing sports. However, we know that in some instances a permanent tooth can get knocked out. Should this happen, it’s best to rinse the tooth in cool water and try and replace the tooth in the socket by having your teen bite down on gauze or a wet washcloth. If the tooth won’t relodge, place it in a small container of milk. In both instances, give us a call right away. We will fit your teen in for an emergency appointment.

How does smoking or vaping affect my teen’s oral health?

We know that smoking is bad for our lungs and parents and educators alike take every opportunity to talk to teens about the dangers of smoking and the risk of lung cancer. But what effect does smoking or vaping have on oral health? It’s important that your teenager knows that smoking causes bad breath, can stain their teeth and tongue, dulls their sense of taste and smell, slows down healing in the mouth and can even lead to tooth loss or mouth cancer. Unfortunately, vaping has become a teenage “acceptable” alternative to smoking. But, it is important to remember that vaping introduces unnatural chemicals into the mouth and the body as well and the long-term effects are expected to be just as harmful as we know smoking to be.

My teen wants to get her tongue pierced. What do I need to know?

Many teens think a tongue piercing is just as harmless as getting their ears pierced but this is simply not true. There are a whole host of complications that can arise from what might seem like a fun teenage fad. Prolonged pain and swelling of the tongue to the point of cutting off the airway are two possible complications. Others include damage to teeth from accidentally biting down on the piercing or clicking it up against teeth and oral infections that can lead to hepatitis or endocarditis. The same issues can occur with lip piercings as well.

At Eggert Family Dentistry, we love our teenage patients! If you or your teen have any additional questions or want to further discuss important ways teens can protect and invest in their smile, give us a call at 651.482.8412 or contact us online.

Preventing Dental Injuries with a Mouthguard

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Mouthguards provide a tremendous amount of protection for your aspiring athlete. From protecting your child’s mouth against structural damage to the teeth and jaw to preventing lacerations to the cheeks, tongue and lips, mouthguards are an investment well worth making! At Eggert Family Dentistry, we recommend mouthguards for football, hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, basketball, baseball/softball, soccer and all other contact sports your child might be participating in.

When purchasing a mouthguard for your child, it’s important to recognize that all mouthguards are NOT created equal. Mouthguards available over-the-counter are generic plastic trays that fit sloppily in your child’s mouth, providing only a minimal level of protection. They are typically made of thicker plastic which can inhibit clear breathing and speaking. On the contrary, at Eggert Family Dentistry, Dr. Jeff and Dr. Elizabeth can create custom mouthguards that securely “hug” your child’s teeth They are more comfortable and provide optimal protection for your child’s pearly whites. On account of their lower profile and custom fit, your athlete won’t have to spend any time worrying about breathing and they are much easier to speak with. In fact, they will pop their mouthguard in and won’t give it a second thought. This allows your child to keep their focus where it truly belongs – on the big game!

A lot of adult athletes enjoy the comfort and protection of a custom athletic mouthguard as well. With more and more adults participating in life-long sports like hockey and basketball, it is especially important to keep that one set of adult teeth fully protected!

If you are interested in learning more about our custom mouthguards at Eggert Family Dentistry, Dr. Jeff or Dr. Elizabeth would love to speak with you. Contact us anytime at 651.482.8412!

How to Navigate Dental Emergencies

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

At Eggert Family Dentistry, we are no stranger to unexpected dental incidents. From sports injuries to falls to hard or sticky foods that wreak havoc on teeth, we know there are plenty of scenarios that can lead to dental damage. The challenge comes in deciphering which scenarios constitute a dental emergency and which scenarios don’t need immediate attention, and then proceeding accordingly.

A cracked or broken tooth is one example of unexpected dental damage. In this case, it’s important to weigh the severity of the fracture. If your tooth is only slightly chipped or cracked, and isn’t resulting in significant nerve discomfort or pain, it’s likely not an emergency and you can call us during regular business hours. However, if your tooth is severely fractured and/or is causing you significant nerve pain (8-10/10 on the pain scale), we recommend you call Eggert Family Dentistry immediately. If the emergency happens after normal business hours, you will be directed to call Dr. Elizabeth’s cell phone number.

In the case of a severe trauma, like if a tooth is knocked out, there is a specific protocol we recommend you observe. Stop bleeding with a cold, wet compress. Then, while handling the tooth as little as possible and not touching the root of the root, try and place the dislodged tooth back into the socket. It is very important to orient the tooth in the correct direction. Lightly biting down on moistened gauze may help temporarily relodge the tooth. If your tooth does not go back into the socket, place it in a small cup of milk to preserve it and transport it to our office. Whether the tooth relodges or not, a knocked out tooth always constitutes an emergency. Call Eggert Family Dentistry right away. The tooth needs to be replanted within an hour.

Occasionally, an abscessed tooth will present itself with immediate and intense nerve pain and/or severe swelling. If you suspect this is happening for you, we recommend you give us a call at the onset of symptoms, once again utilizing Dr. Elizabeth’s cell phone number for after hour emergencies. In the middle of the night, she may not get the call. If at any time you feel like your airway is compromised or the swelling is out of control, it is important to go to the nearest Emergency Room.

We make all dental emergencies a top priority. Dr. Jeff and Dr. Elizabeth intentionally leave slots in their schedules to see patients who are in need of urgent dental care.

If you have any questions regarding dental emergencies, we would be happy to connect with you. We can be reached at 651.482.8412!

Your Child’s Back-to-School Visit: Important Questions You Should Ask

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

We are now well into fall and having to say goodbye to summer and all of the sunshine and spontaneity. Fall can be great too though, with crisp mornings, majestic leaf displays and the comfort of that familiar routine. Oftentimes, getting back into the routine means getting our kids back on track with a visit to Eggert Family Dentistry.

The following are some great questions to bring up the next time we see you and your child:

  1. Can you give me insight into my child’s overall dental health?
    At your child’s recare visit, we will assess the health of your child’s teeth and gums and the development of their bite One thing we are very keyed into these days is how could your child’s development be linked to the airway we can see and evaluate from the mouth. You will hear Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff really evaluating the arch and palate development, the tonsil size, and the tongue shape, among other things.
  2. At what age should thumb-sucking be addressed?
    Thumb-sucking should ideally be stopped as soon as possible as it detrimentally affects the growth and development of the palate and contributes to mouth breathing habits. If your child is a thumb-sucker, it’s good to have this conversation with Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff upfront. They may be able to make recommendations for helping protect your child’s teeth and bone development as well as for broaching the sensitive subject with your child.
  3. What should my child’s daily dental care routine consist of?
    In many ways, your child’s daily dental care routine lays the foundation for a lifetime of dental wellness. At your child’s recare appointment, we will review what kind of toothbrush is best, discuss proper brushing and flossing techniques and explain how certain foods negatively impact tooth enamel.
  4. Can you tell me about x-rays? What are their benefits? Are they safe?
    Many parents have concerns when it comes to x-rays. X-rays are a safe and effective way for Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff to examine in between the teeth as well as the roots and below the gumline. They are the ONLY true way to spot early signs of tooth decay and thereby enact early prevention.
  5. What can you tell me about sealants? Could my child benefit from them?
    You’ve probably heard about sealants but what exactly are they and what is their purpose? This thin coating, when painted onto your child’s molars, can help prevent cavities from forming by sealing in the nooks and crannies that are hard to brush out. Sealants are a great idea for the right patient.
  6. Is my child getting enough fluoride?
    Fluoride is a key player when it comes to protecting your child’s teeth. It helps to strengthen enamel and protects against tooth decay. We can help review fluoride sources and any potential need for supplementation.
  7. If my child has a wiggly tooth is it ok to pull it out at home?
    Ahh, the bane of a parent’s existence – that persistently wiggly tooth that just dangles there taunting you! But is it really a good idea to go ahead and help nature along? It is unlikely that taking a very loose tooth out at home will cause any concern, but if you have more questions, we are happy to help walk you through the risks.
  8. Does my child need a mouth-guard for sports?
    If your child participates in sports, this is certainly a valid question. Contact sports in particular leave teeth susceptible to injury. It is great to have a custom-fit mouth-guard for sports because it is more evenly fabricated for better overall protection. It also is harder for your child to play with during sports because of the great fit.

Being a parent isn’t easy and sometimes it seems impossible to stay on top of it all. It truly takes a village. At Eggert Family Dentistry, you have a partner in family dental health! We are happy to connect with you and get your family rolling with regular dental care for a Lifetime of Smiles. Don’t hesitate to contact us today at 651-482-8412!

Keeping Your Kids Teeth Healthy All School Year Long

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

With the commencement of early-out-the-door mornings, fall sports and school lunches, the ins and outs of the school year routine often make our kids’ teeth more susceptible to damage and decay. At Eggert Family Dentistry, we know that dental vigilance is the biggest precaution against these dangers. Here are some pointers to help your kids protect those sweet smiles all school year long.

  • Teach your kids about the damage that highly-processed foods and sugary foods and beverages can wreak on their teeth. Encourage them to make healthy food choices during school lunch by eating moderate servings of fruits and veggies and passing up juice in favor of water or milk (white milk being highly preferred over chocolate, strawberry, or banana flavors).
  • Water is the optimal beverage choice when it comes to dental health. City water contains fluoride which helps strengthen enamel and protect teeth against decay. Send your kids to school with a large water bottle each day and encourage them to refill it as needed.
  • Between sticks and balls, tackling and checking, fall and winter sports can make teeth more susceptible to damage. At Eggert Family Dentistry, we can help your child be fitted for a custom-fit mouthguard to protect those pearly whites. In addition to a mouthguard, encourage your kids to always wear a helmet for sports that warrant them – practices included! Helmets are also a great layer of protection for your child’s mouth as well as his or her head and face.
  • Brushing twice a day might not seem like a big deal in the summer months but when those early school mornings roll around and everyone is feeling pressed for time, morning brushing often goes by the wayside. Encouraging your kids to brush before breakfast is better than nothing, and can be an easy way to ensure pH levels don’t drop to unsafe acidic levels, making teeth more vulnerable to cavities.
  • This might go without saying, but regular recare visits are the best prevention against tooth damage and decay. Be sure that the school year doesn’t get the best of you by making your family’s recare appointments 6 months in advance. Call us today at 651-482-8412 and we can help you set up your next recare visit.

From all of us at Eggert Family Dentistry, we wish you and your families an easy transition into the school year routine and time to enjoy all the wonder and beauty fall brings. We hope to see you soon!

Eggert Family Dentistry Visits Area Schools For Children’s Dental Health Month!

By Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Eggert Family Dentistry is celebrating Children’s Dental Health month this February! Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff visited Pike Lake Kindergarten Center and presented to 5 classrooms about teeth, cavities, keeping teeth healthy, and healthy food choices. The children were excited to go home with tooth brushes and floss as well as the favorite item – a 2 minute timer!

Our hygienist Joanna also presented to 2 classrooms at the North Oaks Pre-School where the goodie bags were also well received. Our team loves to do these community outreach events, and we always enjoy our time with the kids. We are happy to come to your school too, just call us at 651-482-8412 to arrange it!

Parents can start building healthy oral health habits in children as soon as they’re born! Wiping down a newborns gums twice a day with a soft moistened wash cloth or a bit of damp gauze is very important to the health of their gums. When your little one’s first tooth appears it’s time to get them a toothbrush! Start a soft-bristled brush with a large handle and some water. You can upgrade to fluoride free toothpaste when they turn 1 and as soon as they are able to spit into the sink it’s important to add in a fluoride-based toothpaste to protect their teeth.

          

Good oral care in children is important in preventing cavities, decay, and infection that could compromise their overall health. Kids should brush their teeth twice a day for two minutes each time. It’s a great idea to use a timer in the bathroom to ensure your child is brushing thoroughly and to make it more fun! Flossing removes the plaque from between the teeth where a toothbrush can’t reach so it’s vital that kids get into the habit of flossing once per day.

Finally, bringing your children to us at Eggert Family Dentistry for their regular recare visits is an essential step in maintaining their healthy smile for a lifetime!