Types of TMD Appliances

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

A hot/cold compress can provide temporary relief from TMJ discomfort but realigning the jaw and bite often requires a bolder approach. If Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff determines that your jaw discomfort is the result of TMD, they will create a customized treatment plan for you. More than likely this plan will include a TMD appliance, usually called a splint. Let’s explore the different types of TMD appliances and the benefits of each one.

Common TMD appliance choices include:

Over-the-counter mouthguard

Because they’re available over the counter, these mouthguards can be an affordable option. Unfortunately, because they’re not custom-fit for your mouth, they usually are uncomfortable and difficult to wear while you sleep. They tend to be very bulky and many people find that these mouthguards cause them to grind their teeth more. An OTC mouthguard might be ok as a very short term or emergency alternative to more therapeutic options.

Custom-fit mouthguard or softguard

A custom-fit softguard is fit to your specific teeth and is soft and squishy to bite into. While they can provide some jaw support and are appropriate in certain situations, they are very easy to clench into and can make muscle issues worse.

Essix retainer

After orthodontic tooth movements, it is ideal to wear a retentive device to help keep your teeth in position. An essix retainer is a thin, clear, plastic appliance that is custom-made to your teeth (shown above). At Eggert Family Dentistry, we take impressions of your teeth and fabricate an essix for you within just a few days. Essix retainers do not provide much support for the joints or muscles and therefore do not typically help manage TMD, however, they can be the right choice for some situations. In cases of severe bruxism, these may wear out quickly.

Custom nightguard

Custom nightguards are thicker than Essix retainers and are effective in helping with severe clenching and grinding problems. Because they’re custom-made, they are more secure than over-the-counter mouthguards. These nightguards have a hard exterior and are especially helpful in protecting the teeth against bruxism.

Anterior deprogrammer

This acrylic appliance helps keep your muscles more relaxed and therefore allows a healthy TMJ to also find a relaxed position. An anterior deprogrammer keeps all contact on the front teeth so the strong chewing muscles can’t fire as intensely. This allows for a deprogramming of muscles and can be especially effective at managing headaches and other muscle maladies.

TMD (sometimes called neuromuscular) orthotic

This acrylic appliance helps reposition the jaw by not only supporting the muscles, but also damaged TMJ(s), and is effective in alleviating TMD symptoms. In some cases, this appliance even moves the mandible into a new, more comfortable position. The neuromuscular orthotic can be worn all day and night, but generally not during mealtime.

Seattle protocol appliance(s) for sleep and airway issues

The Seattle Protocol is a method to determine if sleep and airway play a role in your TMD symptoms. It is common for stress hormone to build in the body if you’re not getting good air exchange and/or if your body isn’t getting the restorative sleep it needs. At Eggert Family Dentistry, the Seattle Protocol starts with baseline sleep information. Then, we work you through trial splints to open the airway space available in the mouth, both horizontally and vertically. Once your sleep improves, we often see improvements with TMD symptoms as well. Most often, you then have a final splint fabricated based on trial splint results.

Sleep appliance for apnea or other sleep related breathing disorders

A sleep appliance for apnea typically pulls the jaw into a forward position to increase airway space. These appliances can change the bite with long-term use and therefore are only fabricated after careful consideration and often after conversations with your medical doctor and after moving through the Seattle Protocol at Eggert Family Dentistry.

At Eggert Family Dentistry, we treat TMD cases with the appropriate appliance for you. This not only can lessen the effects of teeth grinding and deprogram incorrect muscle patterns, but can improve your overall quality of life. We may also integrate behavioral and muscle therapies that help you use your jaw muscles differently. Often after managing the TMD, we can also make changes to the teeth for full-time relief of your symptoms. This may include suggestions from Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff for full-mouth reconstruction, orthodontic treatment, or equilibration.

Do you still have questions about TMD? Are you concerned you’re experiencing symptoms of TMD? Give us a call at 651.482.8412. Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff would be happy to speak with you or see you in our office!

How Are TMJ Disorders Diagnosed?

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

In our previous blog, we took the time to clear up confusion over the two terms, TMJ and TMD. Now we’re going to dive into TMD, or temporomandibular disorder, and how it is diagnosed.

When a you come into Eggert Family Dentistry and are complaining of jaw discomfort, Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff will ask you several questions and perform an oral evaluation—this is all part of our records process and often part of our new patient experience. Here are some of the most common TMD symptoms that drive people into our office:

  • Pain when opening or closing the mouth
  • Difficulty chewing
  • Jaw becomes stuck open or shut
  • Headaches, migraines, ear pain, ringing in the ears, double vision
  • Clicking or popping sounds when opening the mouth
  • Teeth grinding
  • Wearing down or breaking of the teeth

After our thorough evaluation, if we determine that you are dealing with TMD, we will find the treatment or combination of treatments that are right for you. This may mean splint therapy, exploration into sleep and airway, changing the bite, or seeking out consultations with the right medical physicians. Jaw discomfort can be associated with other health issues and we want to make sure to help you get to the root of the problem.

You don’t have to live with the discomfort of TMD. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, contact the professionals at Eggert Family Dentistry. Dr. Elizabeth Eggert and Dr. Jeff Eggert have vast experience diagnosing and treating this jaw disorder and can be reached at 651.482.8412. Remember Eggert Family Dentistry for all of your dental needs!

What’s the Difference Between TMD and TMJ?

By Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Our upper and lower jaw bones help our bodies perform many important functions. They help us speak, chew, and yawn. Consequently, our quality of life is directly impacted when our jaw is even slightly irritated or inflamed. When it comes to jaw disorders, there is often confusion between the terms TMJ and TMD. This post will help you decipher between these two terms.

What is TMJ?

TMJ refers to the temporomandibular joint itself, a joint that acts like a sliding hinge, connecting your jawbone to your skull. The lower jawbone (mandible) has two condyles that fit at the base of the skull. This joint can be found on both sides of your head, in front of each ear. The TMJ allows the jaw to open and close so you can speak, chew, and yawn. While many people claim to suffer from TMJ, this term actually refers to the joint as opposed to the joint disorder.

What is TMD?

TMD on the other hand, stands for temporomandibular disorder, a disorder of the temporomandibular joint. This joint is easily irritated by stress, jaw clenching, teeth grinding, and arthritis and is susceptible to misalignment, dislocation, or permanent changes as a result of crooked teeth or blunt trauma. Depending on the cause, discomfort can range from mild to severe. However, just because you’re not experiencing severe pain in your jaw doesn’t mean you should just “ride it out.” Ignoring even mild jaw discomfort can result in deterioration of the TMJ.

In our next post, we will cover the signs and symptoms of TMD and discuss how TMJ disorders are diagnosed. Stay tuned!

If you have any questions about TMD/TMJ or would like to schedule a recare visit with us, you can call our office today at 651.482.8412. Dr. Elizabeth, Dr. Jeff and our amazing team at Eggert Family Dentistry are here and ready to address all of your dental concerns and needs with our vast experience, the latest technology and all of the comforts to make each of your visits a great experience!

Your Dental Cleaning is More Than Just a Cleaning

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

When you schedule a recare visit at Eggert Family Dentistry, you may think that all we will do is remove any plaque we see and polish your teeth. While these services are important, they are just the tip of the iceberg. When you come into our office for a cleaning, we perform a full evaluation and keep an eye out for early signs of more serious problems. 

We check for signs of tooth decay 

Soft spots and pitting are signs that bacteria are breaking down enamel and causing tooth decay. This is most commonly caused by infrequent or poor brushing, frequent snacking and sugary foods and beverages. Acids also contribute significantly to tooth decay. If Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff spot signs of tooth decay, they will recommend scheduling a follow-up appointment to clean out the decay and protect the tooth with a filling or crown, depending on the situation. 

We evaluate the health of your gums

When bacteria hang out along the gum line, they can wreak havoc on gum health. When gum disease is left untreated, it can result in shifting or drifting of teeth and eventual tooth loss. It can also lead to systemic issues such as heart disease, diabetes, lung infections, osteoporosis, hypertension and cancer! When you come in for a cleaning, Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff, as well as our amazing hygiene team, will look for signs of gum irritation including swelling, redness, pocketing or bleeding. Once plaque and tartar are removed, if they observe any of these signs of gum disease, they will recommend next steps to help your gum tissues heal. Oftentimes, in addition to spectacular home dental care habits, this will include a deep cleaning procedure in our office.  

We examine your jaw, facial muscles and lymph nodes

When you come into our office, Dr. Elizbeth or Dr. Jeff make sure your jaw is properly aligned and they look for any issues with your temporomandibular joints. They look for any swelling in the jaw and facial muscles as well, which can be an early sign of an abscessed tooth or infection. They also make sure your lymph nodes are not inflamed. If they find anything unusual, they will recommend next steps to correct the issue. Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff will also inspect your mouth for any signs of oral cancer and if they have any concerns, they will refer you to an oral surgeon or sometimes, a medical doctor. 

We assess the integrity of any existing fillings or other restorations

Fillings are effective at filling in holes in teeth and preventing bacteria from building up and causing cavities but they don’t last forever. Over time, fillings break down and need repair. When fillings crack or become loose, they expose divots in the teeth that can trap bacteria and, left unattended, cause cavities to redevelop. Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff will check the integrity of your fillings and schedule a separate visit if any of them need to be repaired or replaced. 

We take x-rays

At Eggert Family Dentistry, we recommend at least once-a-year x-rays of your teeth. This allows us to look at the roots of your teeth and make sure they’re healthy and strong. We can also look between your teeth and under your gum line in order to spot early signs of infection and decay.

Just because you’re not experiencing teeth or jaw discomfort doesn’t mean problems aren’t brewing. If you haven’t been in to see us for a while, schedule a recare visit by giving us a call at 651.482.8412. We will perform a thorough cleaning and evaluation to protect and preserve your smile for a lifetime! 

Meet Your Hygiene Team

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

In case you didn’t know, October is National Dental Hygiene Month! We want to observe the month by taking some time to introduce ourselves and tell you a little about the history of Eggert Family Dentistry and what we’re all about.

In 2005, Dr. Elizabeth acquired an existing dental practice in North Oaks, a northern St. Paul suburb, and we’ve been operating out of this same building for the past 15 years, just moving down the hall in 2015 to a larger location. We are a family-friendly practice, offering services for patients of all ages. Our services run the gamut from general dentistry to cosmetic work and from orthodontics to full-mouth reconstructions. Our motto is “Dentistry for a Lifetime of Smiles,” and we work hard to that end, partnering with each of our patients to help them achieve a healthy and beautiful smile that will truly last a lifetime. 

Here we highlight our Hygiene Team and thank them for all the wonderful service they provide our patients!

Joanna

“I enjoy working at Eggert Family Dentistry because we have a fun working atmosphere. Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff care for their patients and provide the best dental care for them.”

When she’s not at the office, Joanna enjoys being outside and spending time with family and friends. She resides in Blaine with her husband, Jeffrey, and their four children – Kyle, Kylie, Rylie and Bentley. 

 

Shelly

“I continue to love this profession! The quality of care I have had the privilege to provide over the years has been a direct reflection on those I have served. Meeting patients’ needs through listening, hands-on care and education has been so fulfilling. Our patients are the reason we do what we do.”

Shelly and her husband Ross, have lived in Shoreview for over 25 years. They have twin sons and a daughter, all just on the cusp of adulthood! As a family, they enjoy spending time at their Wisconsin cabin. Shelly loves to cook and enjoys fellowship with others.

Lea

“It is a pleasure to be part of the Eggert Family Dentistry team! We strive to make each visit a pleasant experience and to create a trusting relationship with each patient. I enjoy being part of a team that provides attentive care and top-notch education to help our patients maintain optimal health using the latest technology.”

Lea resides in White Bear Lake with her husband Dan and their two kids – Jonathan and Lauren. They also love their one-year-old black lab, Louie. Lea spends her free time in the garden, going to the cabin, reading and watching her kids play sports.

Cassie

“At Eggert Family Dentistry, our entire team strives to make every patient our number one priority. We provide exceptional, personalized care in a small office setting. I enjoy working with Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff and contributing to the overall patient experience.”

Cassie grew up in Ramsey and graduated from Anoka High School. She now lives in Andover with her husband Jim and their twin boys, Zack and Ryan, and their daughter, Abby. Cassie stays busy with her kids’ activities – baseball, basketball, track and competitive dance. She also enjoys tennis and fun times at the lake boating, swimming and kayaking.

If you’d like to learn more about Eggert Family Dentistry and the services we provide, give us a call at 651.482.8412. We would be happy to connect with you!

Keeping Your Teeth Healthy for a Lifetime of Smiles

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Maintaining a healthy mouth for a lifetime requires a commitment to good habits every day. While it’s best to begin forming these habits in childhood, it’s never too late to experience the benefits of proper oral care. 

The ripple effect of gum disease

Gingivitis occurs when plaque builds up in your mouth and causes gums to become tender and inflamed. If left unattended, gum disease can set in. Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a serious gum infection that is a precursor to a host of increasingly serious health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, lung infections, osteoporosis, hypertension and cancer. Regular brushing, flossing and rinsing can keep plaque from building up in the first place and can help you ward off further problems. 

Sugar and tobacco

When you consume sugar, it increases the amount of acid in your mouth. Acid breaks down sugar but it also erodes tooth enamel.

A few things to keep in mind:

  • Avoiding or limiting the consumption of sugary foods and beverages will help protect your enamel and keep your teeth strong. Consume a diet rich in whole foods and opt for water as your go-to beverage.
  • Frequent snacking increases your risk of tooth decay. Limit snacking and brush after sugary or acidic foods. 
  • Brushing and flossing will help but not negate the negative effects of a poor diet. 

Tobacco is another enemy for a healthy mouth. In fact, smokers who smoke even less than half a pack of cigarettes a day are still almost 300% more likely to contract gum disease than non-smokers. Additionally, tobacco increases your chances of needing a root canal or losing teeth by 200%. It is also linked to a variety of mouth cancers such cancer of the gums, cheeks and lips. Avoiding tobacco products is an enormous investment in your oral and overall wellness. 

The benefits of regular brushing and flossing

Brushing and flossing might sound trivial but its impact cannot be underestimated. In combination with consuming a healthy diet and avoiding tobacco, brushing and flossing will set you up with a healthy smile for life. 

Here are some pointers:

  • Brush at least twice a day for two minutes and floss at least once a day.
  • Use fluoride toothpaste and rinse your mouth with a fluoride mouthwash after brushing. 
  • Switch out your toothbrush 3-4 times each year.
  • Always brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush to avoid damaging your gums.

Recare visits

Scheduling a minimum of two annual recare visits per year helps to ensure that we can help you catch small issues before they become larger issues. When you come in for a routine checkup and cleaning at Eggert Family Dentistry, we clean your teeth, removing stubborn plaque, and assess your mouth for signs of many conditions including cavities, gum disease, bruxism and oral cancer. Dr. Elizabeth and Dr. Jeff then make recommendations based on what they observe, partnering with you to help you achieve optimal dental health. 

If you would like to learn more about how you can take care of your teeth today and experience a lifetime of smiles, we would love to see you in our office! Give us a call at 651.482.8412 to schedule your visit.

 

Causes and Treatment of Gum Recession

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Gum recession happens when the gum tissue that surrounds the teeth wears away, or pulls back, and starts to show the tooth root. The first sign of gum recession you might notice is tooth sensitivity. Gum recession can also make your tooth look longer than normal or you may feel a notch on the tooth near the  gum line.

Treatment for gum recession is necessary, because otherwise the trend is likely to continue, and the supporting tissue and bone structure of the teeth may suffer damage.

What Causes Gum Recession?

Many things can cause your gums to recede, including:

Periodontal disease: Periodontal disease is when bacteria causes an infection and the gum tissue and bone surrounding the teeth are damaged.

Poor dental hygiene: Inadequate brushing, flossing, and rinsing helps plaque to turn into calculus (tartar), which can promote gum recession.

Aggressive tooth brushing: Brushing your teeth too hard or the wrong way can wear away the gums and cause your gums to recede.

Tobacco: Tobacco use causes a sticky plaque to adhere to the teeth. It’s difficult to remove and can cause gum recession.

Teeth grinding and clenching: The excess force of clenching or grinding teeth can make gums recede because of the extra flexure the tooth is subjected to.

Genetics: Some people, as many as 30% of the population, have a genetic vulnerability to periodontal disease, which is a known cause for gum recession.

Hormonal changes: The normal fluctuations in hormone levels which women experience can increase gum sensitivity, making them more vulnerable to gum recession.

Misaligned bite: When teeth come together unevenly, it can place too much force on the gums and bone, promoting gum recession.

Lip or tongue piercing: Friction from jewelry in the mouth can cause gum tissue to erode.

Treatment for Gum Recession

Dr. Elizabeth or Dr. Jeff will have ideas about the right procedure to treat gum recession based on your needs.

For minor gum recession, they may be able to treat it by deep cleaning the affected area. This process is also called scaling and root planning. The treatment involves removing the bacteria surrounding the tooth in the plaque and tartar, including on the root surfaces below the gum line. This procedure can also have additional success if a localized antibiotic is used to kill remaining bacteria and discourage harmful bacteria from re-populating.

When gum recession is more advanced, surgical options are available.

Preventing Gum Recession

Prevention entails the usual steps to improve dental and overall health. Brush and floss daily and come in for regular checkups. Brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush and with proper technique. Dr. Elizabeth, Dr. Jeff, and all the hygienists at Eggert Family Dentistry can help you with this. In addition, there are many options for correcting misaligned bites, quitting tobacco use, and eating a healthy, balanced diet. Call us today at 651.482.8412 to talk about your gum recession issues.

Gingivitis and Periodontitis: What’s the Difference?

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

You’ve heard it time and again: Your Eggert Family Dentistry dentists and hygienists are always urging you to brush and floss for maximum dental health.

Cavities might be the first malady that comes to mind, but preventing cavities is not the only reason to brush and floss faithfully.

Good oral hygiene habits can also prevent gum disease, or even reverse it, in its early stages.

Why is this Important?

A 2018 report by the Journal of Dental Research found that gum disease affects nearly half of all Americans age 30 and over.  That means almost 65 million Americans are battling gum disease.

What is Gum Disease?

Let’s clarify what we mean when we say “gum disease.”

Gum disease is the umbrella term which includes gingivitis and periodontitis and is also known as periodontal disease. It is inflammation of gum tissue, caused by bacterial growth around the tooth, often along and under the gum line.

Periodontal Disease presents in four stages:

Stage 1: Gingivitis, indicated by red or inflamed gums that may bleed during brushing.

Stage 2: Early periodontitis, in which the bone supporting the teeth shows slight loss of bone mass. Other symptoms may not be apparent.

Stage 3: Moderate periodontitis, in which bone around the teeth and gum tissue are damaged and teeth may start loosening.

Stage 4: Advanced periodontitis, in which symptoms are more severe, teeth may be very loose and biting and chewing can be painful. At this stage, it may prove to be difficult to save the teeth.

What is Gingivitis?

Gingivitis is the beginning stage of periodontal disease. It starts because plaque develops on the teeth at the gum line. Without proper removal, this plaque will cause gum inflammation. It’s potentially reversible with proper dental hygiene and intervention. A gingivitis diagnosis should be viewed as a warning sign because if left untreated, it will lead to periodontitis.

What is Periodontitis?

Periodontitis is when the bone that supports the tooth starts to dissolve. This chronic, long-term condition demands treatment by your dental professionals at Eggert Family Dentistry. Bleeding gums, bone loss and receding gums should be addressed and treated because periodontitis will cause tooth loss.

Here’s what happens: There is a small pocket between the gum tissue and the tooth called the sulcus. When bacteria get stuck in this pocket, the gum tissue enlarges and gets inflamed. This starts the infection process. If allowed to continue, the bone surrounding the tooth deteriorates.

Dental Hygiene and Gum Disease

Regular brushing and flossing activities are essential to preserving the health of your teeth and gums. This keeps teeth clean and removes bacteria from a shallow sulcus. There is the bonus effect of revealing whether your gums are in bad shape. If they bleed when brushed or flossed, you’ve got a problem! This is gingivitis.

This early stage of gum disease needs to be treated and closely monitored. Untreated, it will progress and become periodontitis, which is much more difficult to treat.

Impact of Gum Disease

Although it is preventable, gum disease can lead to loss of teeth if not treated. Anyone who gets a diagnosis of gingivitis should take serious action in partnership with Eggert Family Dentistry to reverse this condition.

Preventing Gum Disease

Coming to see us at Eggert Family Dentistry for your recare appointment at your recommended interval is the number one thing you can do to prevent periodontal disease. We know we missed many of you due to the 2020 COVID closure this past spring. We’re here and ready for you. Please visit our website to request an appointment online:  www.eggertfamilydentistry.com. We can’t wait to see you again soon!

Battle of the Brushes: Electric Versus Manual

By: Dr. Elizabeth Eggert

Dental professionals everywhere sing the same tune. Brush your teeth. Twice a day. Two minutes per session.

It’s a critical action for healthy teeth and overall oral wellness.

But what’s the best way? Dr. Elizabeth & Dr. Jeff, and especially our Eggert Family Dentistry hygienists, hear that question all the time. Manual or electric? Which is the best toothbrush for the job?

The ADA (American Dental Association) approves both for removing oral plaque, which causes decay and gum disease.

Let’s explore the pros and cons so you can come to your own personal conclusion on the subject.

Electric Toothbrush: The Pros

Greater cleaning power: One powerful advantage of the electric toothbrush is the ultrasonic vibration they offer. The bristles vibrate or rotate, helping dislodge plaque buildup from your gums and teeth. Those electric micro-movements help ensure good coverage when you brush. Studies show that electric toothbrushes are more effective at decreasing plaque and gingivitis than manual toothbrushes.

Easier for those with limited mobility: Because they do most of the work for you, electric toothbrushes may be best for people with limited mobility, such as people with arthritis, carpal tunnel, or paralysis. They may also be easier to use for people with developmental disabilities.

Built-in timer: Most electric toothbrushes today have an integrated timer, ensuring that you brush for a full two minutes. Many also signal each 30 seconds, so you can make sure you give equal attention to each quadrant of your mouth.

Less waste: In terms of generating trash, electric toothbrushes are generally better than manual because the piece that’s discarded and replaced is smaller.

May be better for people with orthodontic appliances: The high-speed rotating effects or ultrasonic vibrations of an electric toothbrushes can make it easier to brush around braces and other orthodontic appliances.

Kids often love them: Children who resist brushing because they find it boring may be more engaged with an electric toothbrush.

Healthy gum stimulation: An electric toothbrush will stimulate your gum tissues better than a manual brush.

Electric Toothbrush: The Cons

Price: Electric toothbrushes always cost more.

Replacing the heads: It may not be convenient to find replacements, and they are often sold in quantities to last a year or two. While this can be very convenient, it also adds to the investment!

Electricity needed: Most need to plug in to operate or to recharge. Some cheaper versions are battery operated, but then also don’t last as long.

Ticklish to some: Not everyone likes the vibrating sensation, although most people do get used to it.

More mess: Electric toothbrushes tend to generate more saliva, causing splatter to escape the mouth and get all over the bathroom mirror!

Manual Toothbrush: The Pros

Simple & effective: The handheld toothbrush will never go out of style. No electricity, charging, or batteries. Quiet and so portable! The manual toothbrush has stood the test of time.

Ubiquitous and accessible: Pick one up at any pharmacy, gas station or grocery store.

Cheap: Just a few dollars for three months of dental hygiene.

Manual Toothbrush: The Cons

Potential for overuse: According to one study, people using a manual toothbrush may be prone to brushing too hard, which can damage your gums and teeth.

No timer: Are you brushing for at least a full two minutes? If you have doubts, try watching the clock or using a kitchen or cell phone timer.

What’s the bottom line? At Eggert Family Dentistry, we really just want you to brush. Whatever device makes it easiest for you to keep up on your brushing—manual or electric—we support it! Call Eggert Family Dentistry at 651.482.8412 today for any questions you may have.

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Tom Relling

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Anonymous

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Shanaijah Selby

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Les Raney

“I highly recommend Eggert Family Dentistry. The most pleasant dental experience. Shelly is a wonderful hygienist. Friendly, knowledgeable and professional. Dr Elizabeth is a wonderful Dentist. She is gentle, friendly, and amazing, using the latest technology for tooth restoration and other treatments.”

Adam Pickens

“Very friendly and great service when going to Eggert Family Dentistry. The team is always professional and has taken the need precautions during the pandemic to ensure everyone’s safety.”

Teri Waldvogel

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“Everything was great. The Covid-19 prodigal in place were exceptional. Felt safe. Teeth cleaning was fast and thorough.”

Read more patient reviews here.

Alicia Adducci-Hassan

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Michelle Prytz

“I am a new client to Eggert Dentistry and the service I’ve received so far has exceeded my expectations in every way. I have never had a Dentist take so much time and care with me; I highly, highly recommend them!”

Robert Hudson

“Great experience, and took the time to explain everything.”

Marcella Manivel

“I was worried about going to my appointment because of the global pandemic, but even before I got to the appointment, it was clear that they are taking precautions very seriously. My hygienist took my temperature before I entered the building, everyone uses hand sanitizer and wears masks where possible, and I still felt the high quality, personal care that I have always received at Eggert Family Dentistry.”

Tom Jennings

“All very good! Very efficient. Very personable. Enjoy going to the dentist – imagine that.”

John Eggert

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James Miller

“Welcoming, staff.. efficient operation under present circumstances… very professional treatment of client… very helpful advice offered patient….”

Susan Schoon

“I so appreciate Eggert Dentistry. During this season of COVID they did a tremendous job being thorough with cleanliness and distancing when needed. My Dental Hygienist was kind, patient and great with knowledge, ‘touch in my mouth and with my teeth’ and extremely thorough. Dr Elizabeth always takes a generous amount of time with my exam, questions that I might I have from information given and on what to expect down the road. I am blessed with their services.”

Dennis Nelson

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I felt very safe during my visit. Weird thing for me is, I tend to relax at most of my visits. You have a warm, friendly & calming atmosphere. I am glad I made you my dentist.”

Delaney Finn

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